9 Comments
May 24Liked by Deborah Copaken

Please Deb can you address the dangers/safety of taking estrogen if you are very much past menopause, as am I. Very progressive doctors have advised me against.

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The usual guidelines are that you need to start taking estrogen in the narrow window between the end of menses and ten years from that date or age 60, whichever comes first. HOWEVER, even that dogma is being questioned of late. Please read Estrogen Matters. It's the most important book out there on this subject, and they go into all of this.

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Thank you I will!

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I’m well past menopause, brought in by a total hysterectomy with both ovaries removed in 2000. Currently 69. Have been on estrogen now for 4 years and have noticed a significant improvement in my overall health. Adjusting the patch dose, as I was getting tender breast’s at the 0.05mg/d strength, but a minor issue.

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Thank you for this. I'm not understanding the connection between hysterectomy and needing to take estrogen. Did the study look at people who had their ovaries removed? I've had a hysterectomy but kept my ovaries so I don't have an immediate drop in estrogen.

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This is about menopause treatment, post hysterectomy. I don't know how old you were when you got your hysterectomy, but for those of us who got ours around the time we were entering perimenopause, and our estrogen was dropping precipitously because of this--down to zero, once you're in menopause--we were told not to take estrogen for hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause, as well as osteoporosis/heart/brain protection, because of the breast cancer risk. This was, it turns, out, really bad information because, as this new study now proves, estrogen protects those of us with hysterectomies from breast cancer. If you don't have a uterus--whether or not you had your ovaries removed--you do not need to take progesterone with estrogen, because progesterone is only indicated to keep the uterus from getting cancer. It's the combination of progesterone and estrogen which has been thought to be a higher risk for breast cancer, but if you read Estrogen Matters, which I highly recommend, they debunk this, too.

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There is plenty of evidence that even if you keep your ovaries they won’t keep functioning as normal and you are still at higher risk from lack of estrogen. https://ovarianresearch.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13048-023-01117-1#:~:text=Although%20ovarian%20preservation%20is%20increasingly,population%20%5B8%2C%209%5D.

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Taking estrogen is a decision not to make lightly. Not all women who have had hysterectomies need this. One size does not fit all! It’s concerning that you tell women to run out and get estrogen. I’m speaking as a person who had a total hysterectomy at age 51. Maybe I’m unusual. I did not suffer the effects of instant menopause. No hot flashes, brain fog, etc. Maybe I’d be a few pounds lighter if I took estrogen but there’s other ways to lose weight. Don’t extrapolate your personal experience as advice for everyone else.

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I'm not telling women to run out and get estrogen. I'm presenting evidence-based studies and breaking them down for the layperson. Obviously, not every woman can take estrogen. For example, women with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. But the science is becoming clearer and clearer: estrogen is not just for hot flashes. There is evidence--good evidence--to show it aids in osteoporosis prevention, heart disease prevention, and maybe even dementia-prevention, although the latter is still being studied.

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